OSCP经验分享 – 先知社区

Given I have been working in information security for the past few years, I became well aware of the different certifications available as a means of professional development. The certification that stood out as gaining the most respect from the security community seemed to be the “(OSCP) Offensive Security Certified Professional” certificate, I witnessed this time and time again in conversations online. The reason often given is that it is a tough 24 hour practical exam vs a multiple choice questionnaire like many other security certificates. The OSCP is also listed regularly as a desirable requirement for many different kinds of infosec engineering jobs.

I recently received confirmation that I have successfully achieved this certification. To anyone interested in pursuing the OSCP, I would completely encourage it. There is no way you can come away from this experience without adding a few new tricks or tools to your security skills arsenal and aside from all of that, it’s also very fun. This certificate will demonstrate to clients or to any potential employer that you have a good wide understanding of penetration testing with a practical skill-set to back up the knowledge. I wanted to get this as I’ve had clients in the past not follow up on using my services due to me not having any official security certificates (especially CREST craving UK based customers). Hopefully this opens up some doors to new customers.

Before undertaking this course I already had a lot of experience performing vulnerability assessments and penetrations tests, I also had a few CVEs under my belt and have been quite active in the wider information security community by creating tools, taking part in bug bounties and being a fan of responsible disclosure in general. I found the challenge presented by this exam to be quite humbling and very much a worthwhile engagement.

I would describe the hacking with kali course materials and videos as very entry-level friendly which is perfect for someone with a keen interest looking to learn the basics of penetration testing. The most valuable part of the course for those already familiar with the basics is the interactive lab environment, this is an amazing experience and it’s hard not to get excited thinking about it. There were moments of frustration and teeth-grinding but it was a very enjoyable way to sharpen skills and try out new techniques or tools.

I signed up for the course initially a full year ago while working full time on contracts and found it extremely difficult to find the time to work on the labs as I had multiple ongoing projects and was doing bug bounties quite actively too. I burnt out fairly quick and didn’t concentrate on it at all. I did one or two of the “known to be hard” machines in the labs fairly easily which convinced me I was ready and sat the exam having compromised less than 10 of the lab hosts. This was of course silly and I only managed 2 roots and one local access shell which wasn’t near enough points to pass and very much dulled my arrogance at the time. I didn’t submit an exam report and decided to focus on my contracts and dedicate my time to the labs properly at a later date.

Fast forward over a year later to the start of this month (September) and I had 2 weeks free that I couldn’t get contract work for. So I purchased a lab extension with the full intention of dedicating my time completely to obtaining this certificate. In the two weeks I got around 20 or so lab machines and set the date for my first real exam attempt. This went well but I didn’t quite make it over the line. I rooted 3 machines and fell short of privilege escalating on a 4th windows host. I was so close and possibly could have passed if I did the lab report and exercises, however this time around I wasn’t upset by the failure and became more determined than ever to keep trying. I booked another 2 weeks in the labs, focused on machines with manual windows privilege escalation and booked my next exam sitting, successfully nailing it.

As I had learned a lot of penetration testing skills doing bug bounties, I found that it was very easy to identify and gain remote access to the lab machines, I usually gained remote shell access within the first 20 or 30 minutes for the large majority of the attempted targets. I very quickly found out that my weakest area was local privilege escalation. During my contract engagements, it is a regular occurrence that my clients request I don’t elevate any further with a remote code execution issue on a live production environment. This activity is also greatly discouraged in bug bounties so I can very much see why I didn’t have much skill in this area. The OSCP lab environment taught me a large amount of techniques and different ways of accomplishing this. I feel I have massively skilled up with regard to privilege escalation on Linux or Windows hosts.

I’m very happy to join the ranks of the (OSCP) Offensive Security Certified Professionals and would like to thank anyone who helped me on this journey by providing me with links to quality material produced by the finest of hackers. Keeping the hacker knowledge sharing mantra in mind, below is a categorized list of very useful resources I have used during my journey to achieving certification. I hope these help you to overcome many obstacles by trying harder!

Mixed

https://www.nop.cat/nmapscans/

https://github.com/1N3/PrivEschttps://github.com/xapax/oscp/blob/master/linux-template.mdhttps://github.com/xapax/oscp/blob/master/windows-template.mdhttps://github.com/slyth11907/Cheatsheetshttps://github.com/erik1o6/oscp/https://backdoorshell.gitbooks.io/oscp-useful-links/content/https://highon.coffee/blog/lord-of-the-root-walkthrough/

MsfVenom

https://www.offensive-security.com/metasploit-unleashed/msfvenom/
https://netsec.ws/?p=331

Shell Escape Techniques

https://netsec.ws/?p=337

https://pen-testing.sans.org/blog/2012/06/06/escaping-restricted-linux-shellshttps://airnesstheman.blogspot.ca/2011/05/breaking-out-of-jail-restricted-shell.htmlhttps://speakerdeck.com/knaps/escape-from-shellcatraz-breaking-out-of-restricted-unix-shells

Pivoting

http://www.fuzzysecurity.com/tutorials/13.html

http://exploit.co.il/networking/ssh-tunneling/https://www.sans.org/reading-room/whitepapers/testing/tunneling-pivoting-web-application-penetration-testing-36117https://highon.coffee/blog/ssh-meterpreter-pivoting-techniques/https://www.offensive-security.com/metasploit-unleashed/portfwd/

Linux Privilege Escalation

https://0x90909090.blogspot.ie/2015/07/no-one-expect-command-execution.html

https://resources.infosecinstitute.com/privilege-escalation-linux-live-examples/#grefhttps://blog.g0tmi1k.com/2011/08/basic-linux-privilege-escalation/https://github.com/mzet-/linux-exploit-suggesterhttps://github.com/SecWiki/linux-kernel-exploitshttps://highon.coffee/blog/linux-commands-cheat-sheet/https://www.defensecode.com/public/DefenseCode_Unix_WildCards_Gone_Wild.txthttps://github.com/lucyoa/kernel-exploitshttps://www.rebootuser.com/?p=1758https://www.securitysift.com/download/linuxprivchecker.pyhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1A7yJxh-fychttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2NMB-pfCHT8https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dk2wsyFiosghttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MN3FH6Pyc_ghttps://www.slideshare.net/nullthreat/fund-linux-priv-esc-wprotectionshttps://www.exploit-db.com/exploits/39166/https://www.exploit-db.com/exploits/15274/

Windows Privilege Escalation

https://blog.cobaltstrike.com/2014/03/20/user-account-control-what-penetration-testers-should-know/

https://github.com/foxglovesec/RottenPotatohttps://github.com/GDSSecurity/Windows-Exploit-Suggester/blob/master/windows-exploit-suggester.pyhttps://github.com/pentestmonkey/windows-privesc-checkhttps://github.com/PowerShellMafia/PowerSploithttps://github.com/rmusser01/Infosec_Reference/blob/master/Draft/ATT%26CK-Stuff/Windows/Windows_Privilege_Escalation.mdhttps://github.com/SecWiki/windows-kernel-exploitshttps://hackmag.com/security/elevating-privileges-to-administrative-and-further/https://pentest.blog/windows-privilege-escalation-methods-for-pentesters/https://toshellandback.com/2015/11/24/ms-priv-esc/https://www.gracefulsecurity.com/privesc-unquoted-service-path/https://www.commonexploits.com/unquoted-service-paths/https://www.exploit-db.com/dll-hijacking-vulnerable-applications/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMG8IsCohHA&feature=youtu.behttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PC_iMqiuIRQhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqfC4gU0SnYhttps://www.exumbraops.com/penetration-testing-102-windows-privilege-escalation-cheatsheet/Xhttps://www.fuzzysecurity.com/tutorials/16.htmlhttp://www.labofapenetrationtester.com/2015/09/bypassing-uac-with-powershell.html

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13 Free InfoSec Training Resources For IT Pros


Man on laptop, seo tips Credit: Shutterstock

There are all kinds of free training resources available for information security professionals. They typically come in two flavors — those designed to help prepare you for a security certification or to fill in security knowledge gaps. While some courses require you to sign up, others start with just one click, so you can browse and decide quickly if they’re right for you.

Cybrary

Credit: Cybrary

Longtime IT and cybersecurity trainers, Ralph P. Sita, Jr. and Ryan J. Corey, launched Cybrary in January 2015. The Cybrary course catalog is impressive — it contains more than 100 courses spread across systems administration, network administration, cloud computing and cybersecurity. The bulk of the courses are geared toward some IT certification, such as the Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), (ISC)2 CISSP and Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA); while other courses focus on skills, like using the Metasploit Framework, Python for security professionals, plus malware analysis and reverse engineering.

All courses are delivered online, and include lectures, interactive lab demonstrations and study guides. Cybrary now offers exam vouchers for CompTIA and other popular cyber security certifications as well.

Information Assurance Support Environment (IASE)

Credit: IASE

The Information Assurance Support Environment (IASE) offers a bevy of interactive web-based training courses that cover cybersecurity awareness, cybersecurity for senior leaders, professionals and technical professionals, cyber law, NetOps and DoD cyber tools. Each course takes 20 minutes to longer than 1 hour to complete.

IASE also offers CyberProtect, a DoD game-like simulator that puts you in charge of security for an entire IT infrastructure. You choose security tools and deploy them on the simulated network, and then make decisions about mitigating risks, threats and vulnerabilities. It’s fun and educational. Its Cyber Awareness Challenge has recently been updated for 2018, but still requires Adobe Flash support to run.

InfoSec Institute

Credit: Infosec

The InfoSec Institute offers a multi-module video-based course on CISSP cryptography, typically the most challenging part of the CISSP exam for most candidates, as well as a free, downloadable CISSP study guide. The latest version of their document The CISSP Domains bears the subtitle 2015 Update, and is entirely in sync with the current structure and contents of the CISSP Common Body of Knowledge. InfoSec Institute site visitors can also take progressive, custom and simulated CISSP practice exams through Skillset.

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Credit: National Institutes of Health

The National Institutes of Health offers mini training courses on information security, privacy and security awareness. All courses take less than 1 hour to complete. Here’s the course list available, as of this writing:

Offensive Security Metasploit Unleashed

Credit: Offensive Security

If you’re interested in learning how to use the Metasploit Framework and Metasploit Pro for penetration testing, check out Offensive Security’s Metasploit Unleashed course, put together in part by the authors of “Metasploit: The Penetration Tester’s Guide” (No Starch Press, 2011). Although the course is free to all, Offensive Security asks that satisfied course takers make a small donation to Hackers for Charity.

SANS Cyber Aces Online

Credit: SANS Cyber Aces

The folks at the highly regarded SANS Institute offer information security courses and tutorials through SANS Cyber Aces Online. Geared toward high school and college students, instructors, military vets and pretty much anyone looking for a job in the information security industry, the courses are designed to help people gain essential security knowledge. Three modules are available, each of which consists of several video-based modules (with or without quizzes):

  • Introduction to Operating Systems
  • Networking
  • System Administration

SANS states that the courses “are the same as those offered to information security professionals around the world,” which we assume means via SANS training events.

FEMA National Training and Education Division

Credit: FEMA

FEMA’s National Training and Education Division include several free self-study courses on cybersecurity for non-technical workers and IT professionals. These free courses cover digital forensics, cyber law and cyber ethics, information risk management, and more. The only downside is that you must apply for each training course you want to take, and the process might vary slightly by state. As of this writing, the catalog includes 25 courses under the heading of “Cyber Security” on topics that include cyber-terrorism and response, critical infrastructure security and protection, web-based security and risk management, and more. It is disaster or service interruption oriented, as you’d expect from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

(ISC)2 Center for Cyber Safety and Education

Credit: ISC

The International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium is usually denoted (ISC)2 and pronounced “eye-ess-cee squared.” This is the certification sponsor for the CISSP and numerous other high-value information security credentials. (ISC)2also offers a variety of training materials related to safe and secure computing, including courses for parents and guardians, children, seniors and more. Created in concert with the Center for Cyber Safety and Education, these materials are useful for end users or for anyone trying to get a handle on basic information security concepts, tools and best practices.

Heimdal Security’s Guide to 50+ Cyber Security Online Courses

Credit: Heimdal

Heimdal Security is a vendor that offers information security tools and systems, with a focus on the financial services industry and data protection and privacy. (Heimdal was the Norse deity responsible for monitoring security of the Bifrost bridge that links Asgard to the Earth.) The company has put together a nice compendium of cyber security courses online. You can click directly into categories for free security training for beginners and advanced professionals to narrow your search immensely.

Cal Poly Information Security: Security Training Materials

Credit: California Polytechnic State University

California Polytechnic State University has compiled a nice collection of links to posters, videos, quizzes and professional development opportunities for students, faculty and staff. You’ll find information about password protection, home computer security, identity theft, phishing and spyware, and more, with quizzes to back up those materials (and to help you make sure you understand what you’ve learned).

Risk3Sixty: Free Information Security Training Materials

Credit: Risk3Sixty

These materials include a training video, plus a follow-up examination and answer key, designed to help companies and other organizations teach their employees about basic information security principles and best practices. It’s an interesting way to see what passes for security awareness and consciousness training nowadays, and is meant to give companies a leg up in training their workers to practice safe computing and resist social engineering and other forms of attack.

OWASP: Education/Free Training

Credit: OWASP

OWASP stands for Open Web Application Security Project, and represents a broad industry group of IT and development professionals interesting in promoting the development and secure use of web-based applications and services. This collection covers topics of great interest to developers who build and test such things, and administrators who must install, secure and maintain them. The materials list includes more than a dozen course units of the material on the general subject of Application Security, and is well worth auditing for developers and for practicing and aspiring security professionals as well.

CyberSecurity MOOCs: Free Online Cyber Security Courses

MOOC is an acronym for Massively Open Online Courses, free online university-level courses that are gaining huge popularity and attendance among interesting parties and IT professionals around the world. This compilation includes more than 20 MOOCs from institutions such as MIT, The Open University, the University of Maryland, Excelsior College and many more. For those seeking serious, college-level exposure and coverage to the topic, this is probably the best single resource in this story. For much more of this kind of thing, visit MOOCse.com (the MOOC search engine) and search on some or all “cyber security,” “information security” or cyber security certification names.

Ed Tittel

Ed is a 30-year-plus veteran of the computing industry, who has worked as a programmer, a technical manager, a classroom instructor, a network consultant and a technical evangelist for companies that include Burroughs, Schlumberger, Novell, IBM/Tivoli and NetQoS. He has written and blogged for numerous publications, including Tom’s Hardware, and is the author of over 140 computing books with a special emphasis on information security, Web markup languages and development tools, and Windows operating systems.

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Hot IT Certification Path for Cyber Security Professionals

Subject matter experts break down a best-in-class certification track for IT security professionals.

cyber security certification path

As cyber attacks continue to escalate in frequency and sophistication, businesses are making it a top priority to acquire talent who can help protect their digital data and infrastructure. In a high-stakes field where protocols change at the speed of attackers’ imagination, only those with the latest and greatest skills will succeed. Certifications are the best way to prove the value and relevance of your cyber-security skill set to prospective employers.

With dozens of globally-recognized certifications to choose from, mapping out a cyber security learning plan can feel overwhelming. This post will break down an ideal vendor-neutral certification track for IT security professionals.

Why vendor-neutral? Vendor-neutral certifications demonstrate expertise that can be applied across multiple technologies, as opposed to vendor-specific certifications, which validate skills in a particular product line, such as Cisco network devices. Once you have the job (or have it in your sights) and you know which technologies the company uses, then it’s time to pursue vendor-specific certs.

Here is a rock-solid certification path for general cyber security professionals:

Entry-Level

Security+

CompTIA’s Security+ is an ideal starting point for your cyber security certification path. Security+ certification covers both theory and practical applications in a range of hot security topics, including network attacks and countermeasures, application security, risk management, compliance and operational security. Government agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), use Security+ as a benchmark for entry-level talent, opening the door to a range of opportunity-rich jobs in the public sector. Enterprises (such as IBM) and leading certifying bodies (like EC-Council) also use Security+ as a prerequisite in their training and certification tracks.

Top Entry-Level Security Certification Alternatives:

  • ISC2 Systems Security Certified Practitioner (SSCP)
  • GIAC Information Security Fundamentals Certification (GISF)
  • Prometric Cyber Security Essentials

Intermediate

Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)

EC-Council’s CEH certification curricula teaches network security specialists to think like malicious hackers. By using the tools and techniques of attackers, certified ethical hackers can proficiently identify system vulnerabilities and implement the appropriate safeguards and countermeasures. While the CEH is ostensibly focused on penetration-testing, it’s usefulness and marketability transcend this niche, making it an ideal mid-level credential for all infosec specialists.

GIAC Security Essentials Certification (GSEC)

By concentrating on today’s leading business technologies, GSEC certification demonstrates the skills and expertise needed to protect the modern enterprise. GSEC certified professionals can secure popular operating systems, such as Microsoft Windows and Linux/Unix, as well as widely used enterprise technologies, including wireless networks, virtual machines and e-commerce websites.

Top Intermediate Security Certification Alternatives:

  • ISC2 Certified Authorization Professional (CAP)
  • GIAC Information Security Professional (GISP)
  • CWNP Certified Wireless Security Professional (CWSP)

Advanced

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)

The CISSP certification from ISC2 is the preeminent expert-level IT security credential. Certified Information Systems Security Professionals possess a deep knowledge of real-world tactics in ten of today’s vital cyber security domains, including network security, risk management, software development security, business continuity and disaster recovery, policy creation, regulatory compliance and operations security. Candidates for this certificate must have (and be able to document) 5+ years of experience in two or more of the 10 CISSP security domains to sit for the exam.

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)

ISACA’s CISM certification demonstrates mastery of four skill areas that are vital to cyber security management, including information security governance, risk management, security program creation and incidence response. While the CISM doesn’t cover as many security domains or individual tactics as the CISSP, the key advantage of CISM is it’s focus on how information security fits into the larger picture, i.e., the relationship between security programs and broader business goals. The CISM’s unique focus on global security strategy and management makes it an ideal certification for those seeking a position in IT security leadership, such as CSO, Information Security VP or Manager.

Top Alternative Security Certs at the Advanced Level:

  • ASIS Certified Protection Professional (CPP)
  • CompTIA Advanced Security Practitioner (CASP)

The usefulness and marketability of these five credentials make for an ideal certification track in the general cyber security field. As you begin to certify and enter the workforce, you will likely discover which IT security domains best fit your passions and career goals; at this point there is a wide range of vendor-specific and niche security certificates you may want to pursue. For a broader look at the cyber security certification landscape, I recommend this comprehensive list of credentials from TechTarget.com.

If you have any insight about how these or other cyber security certifications worked (or didn’t work) for your career, or questions about your cyber security learning plan, please share it with our readers and subject matter experts in the comments section below.

Follow the author of this post on Google+ for a first-look at related articles.

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Technical Training Schedule

GLOBALKNOWLEDGE PH INC.

Tel. Nos.: (632) 705-1274 / 668-6531 | Mobile: +63.917.307.3822
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2020 Q1 – Q2 TECHNICAL TRAINING SCHEDULE

CISCO & OTHER NETWORKING COURSES

COURSE TITLE

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

DURATION

1

Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 1 with exam

6-8

3-5

2-4

6-8

4-6

1-3

3 Days

2

Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 2 with exam

9-11

6-8

4-8

8-10

7-9

4-6

3 Days

3

XTREME CCNA PROGRAM w/ Exam

13-17

10-14

9-13

13-17

4-8

15-19

5 Days

4

CCNA Security

20-24

18-21

16-20

13-17

11-15

1-5

5 Days

5

Implementing Cisco IP Routing

27-31

18-21

16-20

20-24

18-22

8-12

5 Days

6

Implementing Cisco IP Switched Networks

TBA

24-28

23-27

27-Jun1

26-29

15-19

5 Days

7

Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks

TBA

24-28

30-May3

TBA

26-29

22-26

5 Days

EC-COUNCIL COURSES & CERTIFICATIONS

COURSE TITLE

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

DURATION

8

Certified Secure Computer User w/ EXAM

6-7

3-4

4-5

2-3

4-5

1-2

2 Days

9

Certified Ethical Hacker w/ EXAM

13-17

10-14

9-13

13-17

11-15

1-5

5 Days

10

Computer Hacking Forensics Investigation w/ Exam

20-24

18-21

16-20

13-17

11-15

8-12

5 Days

11

EC-Council Certified Security Analyst/LPT w/ Exam

27-31

24-28

16-20

20-24

18-22

22-26

5 Days

12

LPT Master Practical (online)

13

Disaster Recovery w/ EXAM

8-10

5-7

11-13

11-13

26-29

3-5

3 Days

14

EC-Council Project Management in IT Security w/ Exam

6-7

10-11

16-17

9-10

4-5

1-2

2 Days

15

Certified Incident Handler

16-27

12-13

18-19

5-6

5-6

2-3

2 Days

16

Certified Chief Information Security Officer (CCISO) (Saturdays only)

TBA

8,15,22,29 – Sat

TBA

7,14,21,28 Sat

6-7

2-5

4 Days

ECDL/ICDL TRAINING & CERTIFICATIONS (International / European Computer Driving License)

COURSE TITLE

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

DURATION

17

IT Security

6-7

3-4

2-3

1-2

7-8

1-2

2 Days

18

Computer Essentials

8-9

5-6

3-4

2-3

11-12

2-3

2 Days

19

Online Essentials

9-10

7-8

4-5

6-7

12-13

3-4

2 Days

20

Online Collaboration

TBA

10-11

5-6

7-8

13-14

4-5

2 Days

21

Image Editing

TBA

11-12

6-7

8-9

14-15

8-9

2 Days

22

Web Editing

TBA

12-13

9-10

9-10

15-16

9-10

2 Days

23

Project Planning

21-22

13-14

10-11

10-11

18-19

10-11

2 Days

24

ICT in Education

TBA

14-15

11-12

13-14

19-20

11-12

2 Days

26

Office Applications

23-24

10-11

12-13

14-15

20-21

12-13

2 Days

DATA PRIVACY & CERTIFICATION

COURSE TITLE

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

DURATION

27

Philippine Republic Data Privacy Act of 2012- Compliance

23-25

13-14

19-20

15-17

14-16

3-5

3 Days

NEW DIGITAL FORENSICS & IT SECURITY COURSES

COURSE TITLE

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

DURATION

28

Foundations of Digital Forensics

6-7

3-4

2-3

15-16

21-22

1-2

2 Days

29

Human Centered Security

7-8

5-6

3-4

16-17

26-27

2-3

2 Days

30

Identify Management

9-10

7-8

4-5

16-17

27-28

3-4

2 Days

31

Incident Response & Investigations

13-14

10-11

5-6

20-21

28-29

4-5

2 Days

32

Key Management and PKI

14-15

11-12

6-7

21-22

28-29

8-9

2 Days

33

Managing Information Security

15-16

12-13

9-10

22-23

26-27

9-10

2 Days

34

Network Security

16-17

13-14

10-11

23-24

27-28

10-11

2 Days

35

Physical Security & Technical Surveillance

20-21

14

11

24

29

12

1 day

36

Risk Assessment

21-22

10-11

12-13

27-28

28-29

12-13

2 Days

37

Security in Smart Card Technology

22-23

12-13

13-14

28-29

28-29

15-16

2 Days

38

Implementing Information Security Standards Based on ISO 27001 & ISO27002 (Saturday only)

27-30

11-14

16-19

29-30

5-8

15-18

4 Days

39

Security Testing

23-24

7-8

16-17

27-28

7-8

15-16

2 Days

40

System Security

27-28

10-11

18-19

29-30

11-12

16-17

2 Days

41

Understanding Cryptography

28-29

11-12

19-20

10-11

12-13

17-18

2 Days

42

Wireless Security

29-30

12-13

23-24

13-14

13-14

18-19

2 Days

CERTIFICATE & DIPLOMA IN PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

COURSE TITLE

STATUS

DURATION

43

Certificate in Cyber Security Strategy and Policy

NOW ACCEPTING ENROLLEES

3-6 Mos.

44

ITSP – Diploma in Information Technology Security Program

NOW ACCEPTING ENROLLEES

2 Years

45

2-yr. Diploma in Fine Arts

NOW ACCEPTING ENROLLEES

3-6 Mos.

46

2-yr. Diploma in Fashion Design

NOW ACCEPTING ENROLLEES

2 Years

COMPTIA & LOGICAL OPERATIONS COURSES & CERTIFICATIONS

COURSE TITLE

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

DURATION

47

IT Fundamentals

6-8

5-7

2-4

1-3

4-6

1-3

3 Days

48

A+ PC Assembly and Troubleshooting

6-10

3-7

2-6

6-10

4-8

1-5

5 Days

49

Network+

13-17

10-14

9-13

6-10

11-15

8-12

5 Days

50

Security+

27-31

10-14

16-20

13-17

18-22

15-19

5 Days

51

CompTIA Security Analyst

21-24

3-7

23-27

13-17

26-29

22-26

5 Days

52

CompTIA Penetration Tester (CPT+)

6-10

10-14

30-Apr 3

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4-8

1-5

5 Days

53

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2-6

27-30

11-15

8-12

5 Days

54

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55

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26-29

22-26

5 Days

56

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4-8

1-5

5 Days

58

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23-27

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4-8

1-5

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62

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23-27

13-17

26-29

22-26

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65

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13-17

13-15

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Structured Cabling

17

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6

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22

19

1 day

69

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8-10

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YEARLY EVENTS / SEMINARS

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2020

DURATION

75

WHAT THE HACK 2020

1 day

76

DATAHACK 2020

1 day

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CompTIA Security+ Certification Classes with Exam Voucher at ONLC Training Centers

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DIY or Hire a Pen Tester?

A penetration test, when carried out by outside experts, is the best way to establish how vulnerable your network is from a malicious hacker attack.

But while thorough, third-party penetration testing can be expensive and is effectively out of date as soon as you make changes to your infrastructure or as new vulnerabilities that affect it are discovered.

One way to sidestep both of these problems is to carry out your own network penetration tests. In this article, we’ll discuss both how to do your own security testing and conduct internal penetration testing, and how to find the best third-party service should you choose to hire an outside pen tester.

See our picks for top penetration testing tools.

According to eSecurity Planet‘s 2019 State of IT Security survey, 64 percent of organizations conduct pen tests at least annually, so as many as 36 percent of organizations are taking unnecessary risks by ignoring this important security best practice.

https://o1.qnsr.com/log/p.gif?;n=203;c=204660766;s=9477;x=7936;f=201812281312070;u=j;z=TIMESTAMP;a=20392931;e=i

What is penetration testing?

Penetration testing, also called vulnerability assessment and testing or “pen testing” for short, is a simulated attack on your organization’s network to assess security and determine its vulnerabilities. These white hat attacks are designed to do the following:

  • Identify network security issues and other vulnerabilities
  • Identify policy compliance failures
  • Improve employee awareness of proper security practices
  • Assess an organization’s effectiveness in responding to an attack.

Pen testing is one the quickest ways to find out if your organization’s security is up to the challenge, and if not, what the vulnerabilities are that you need to address.

It’s important to point out that carrying out your own pen test won’t be as effective as hiring an expert, because expert pen testing requires experience, skill and creativity. Those are qualities that only professional penetration testers (and expert hackers) are likely to have.

Even if your security team has penetration testing experience, many experts believe that a third party coming to your network with fresh eyes is more likely to spot potential problems. Familiarity with your own network can actually leave you blinded to possible security vulnerabilities when conducting on-site security testing.

Nonetheless, having the capability to run your own penetration tests is still a good idea because it enables you to run a test whenever you buy new equipment, install new software or make other big changes to your network, alerting you to obvious vulnerabilities you’ve overlooked.

Penetration testing: the DIY basics in 7 steps

Think of internal penetration tests as walking around your house and making sure you haven’t left any windows open before you go out. It’s a sensible precaution that costs almost nothing. Here we share a 7-step penetration testing methodology that should prove useful for many organizations.

Penetration Testing Basics

1. Network enumeration and mapping

This first step often involves port scanning to work out the topology of a network, and to establish which computers are connected to it and the operating system and services they are offering. Perhaps the most popular tool for carrying out this task is the open source Nmap, sometimes accessed through the Zenmap GUI.

2. Reconnaissance

This involves contacting the machines on the network and extracting information from them such as the applications they are running. Reconnaissance can also involve Googling for information about the organization being tested, for example, to find out the names of IT staff and executives. This kind of information can be useful for social engineering and phishing exercises (see Step 7 below). Social media accounts for such people can also reveal information such as pet names, which are often used in passwords.

3. Network sniffing

Network sniffing is used to examine traffic flowing over the network and to search for unencrypted data including passwords or VoIP traffic. The de-facto standard for network sniffing is Wireshark, another open source tool.

4. Vulnerability scanning

A vulnerability scan can reveal whether any machines have insecure versions of software or other known vulnerabilities that can be exploited, or whether any wireless access points are open or have weak passwords. A popular open source vulnerability tool is OpenVAS. Other more specialist scanners can also be directed at web servers to look for vulnerabilities such as cross-site scripting (XSS) errors.

Open source scans can be enhanced by proprietary vulnerability scanners that can alert you to vulnerable applications that could be exploited. These include:

  • Nessus Professional
  • Rapid7 Nexpose
  • Qualys FreeScan

See our picks for top vulnerability scanning tools.

5. Exploit launching

This stage of penetration testing attempts to exploit any known vulnerabilities to gain control of a system. It’s important to remember that although a vulnerability scan may reveal a vulnerability, not all vulnerabilities can be successfully exploited or necessarily lead to a serious breach. An exploitation framework like Metasploit contains a database of ready-made exploits that it can match to vulnerabilities, as well as tools for creating and launching your own exploits.

Many security systems are aware of and will detect Metasploit exploits, but it is important to note that a real hacker might tailor their own exploits, so don’t be tempted to believe that your infrastructure is safe just because your security systems prevent a Metasploit exploit from working.

6. Further exploitation

Once a single vulnerable system is compromised, you can leverage this to penetrate the network further. For example, if it is possible to access a server’s password file, a password cracking tool may then yield valuable passwords. Using the knowledge gained from the reconnaissance phase, these passwords can then be used to compromise more systems and access more data.

Password cracking tools include the offline John the Ripper, for processing password files that are exfiltrated from the network you are testing, or the online open source tool Hydra, a parallelized login brute forcer which can attempt to log in to services such as ftp by trying multiple login/password combinations in a very short space of time.

7. Phishing and social engineering

No penetration test is complete without seeing what access is possible by tricking employees. That means sending out phishing emails or simply phoning them up to try to entice them to reveal login details or other confidential information.

Penetration testing tools, training and Linux distros

No penetration testing tutorial would be complete without a guide to useful pen testing tools. To carry out a penetration test manually you’ll need a number of tools including the ones mentioned above. The best way to access all the tools you need in one place is to download an open source Linux security distribution. Recommended distros include:

These distros contain hundreds of other open source tools for network reconnaissance and enumeration, vulnerability scanning, password cracking, wireless security auditing and much more.

The problem with these distros is that if you are not familiar with the tools they contain, it can be difficult to know where to start. One solution is to complete training with some of the tools that you’ll find on security distributions.

Some penetration testing training options include the following:

  • Penetration Testing Training with Kali Linux. A self-paced online penetration testing course designed for network administrators and security professionals who want to take a serious step into penetration testing. The training is provided by Offensive Security, the creators of Kali Linux and one of the top penetration testing training and certification organizations.
  • Metasploit Unleashed. The Metasploit Unleashed ethical hacking training course is provided free of charge and is probably the most complete and in-depth guide available for the famous Metasploit Project penetration testing tool.
  • InfoSec Institute’s Penetration Testing Online. InfoSec Institute’s Penetration Testing Online is a comprehensive online penetration testing course containing over 100 modules and over 100 hours of online training. Because of the amount of material available, most students take a full 60 days to complete the course.

For more open source penetration testing resources, see 10 Open Source Pentest Tools.

Consider automated penetration testing tools

An easier way to carry out your own penetration test is to use an automated penetration testing tool, which will carry out some or all of these steps with minimal intervention, or use wizards to guide you.

The benefit of this approach is that it can reveal more straightforward problems on your network. An additional benefit is that less skilled hackers may use some of these tools as well, so by running them before hackers do, you are in a position to mitigate any problems found before hackers find them.

There is a limit to what these tools can do, however. A skilled hacker or penetration tester may use a combination of tactics, such as phishing and social engineering, to compromise your defenses and wreak havoc, or they may spot a vulnerability that may take a great deal of ingenuity and creativity to exploit. Automated tools are unable to replicate this.

Most automated penetration software is supplied as a commercial product. These products include:

  • Rapid7 Metasploit
  • Immunity Canvas
  • Core Impact Pro

The risks of DIY network penetration testing

Before you think about carrying out your own network penetration tests, be aware of what can go wrong. Penetration tests, whether manual or automated, involve unleashing scans and probes onto your network. These could slow it down, make your computers run sluggishly for a time or even crash one or more of your systems, potentially disrupting your business. Because so much can potentially go wrong, get all the training you can – and consider at least starting off with a third-party pen tester.

How to find the right pen testing company

A penetration testing company will use techniques similar to those used by cybercriminals to search for – and attempt to safely exploit – vulnerabilities in your infrastructure. It will then provide a report highlighting any security problems that it discovers.

However, a pen test is only as good as the person carrying out the test, and it’s only of value if the penetration tester looks at the right things and reports back to you in a way that’s useful.

So, how do you choose a penetration testing company?

1. Establish a company’s qualifications

“Lots of IT service companies will say that they can carry out penetration tests for you, but you need to find a credible company that is qualified to deliver them,” said Pravesh Kara, a managing consultant at pen testing specialist Perspective Risk.

It’s critical to look for a company with specialist penetration testers, and to establish the penetration testing credentials of the person or people who will conduct the test. There are many good qualifications to look out for, including CHECK team leader, Offensive Security Certified Professional and Mile2 Certified Penetration Testing Consultant or Certified Ethical Hacker. Certified pen testers will help you get the vulnerability information you need, and they’re also pretty good certs for IT security pros to have in general.

Testimonials or references from customers are also useful to help you establish a penetration testing company’s credentials.

2. Scope the penetration test

Scoping the penetration test will often be defined by your motivation for getting a pen test in the first place. “There is always a driver for a penetration test, and often that is a regulatory requirement or something required by a customer. In that case, the driver defines the scope,” Kara said.

For example, if you handle customer credit card information, the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) has a method for testing, so the scope can be defined from that.

But you may decide it is wise to have a penetration test carried out for less well-defined reasons. For example, perhaps you have acquired another company and taken on responsibility for a pre-existing IT infrastructure. “In that case, a good penetration testing firm should be able to help you scope a test,” says Mike McLaughlin, a senior penetration tester at First Base Technologies, a penetration testing company.

“Alternatively, you should be able say, ‘Here’s my budget, tell me how you can use that best’,” he said.

3. Look at social engineering

One important consideration is whether you want to restrict your penetration test to the technical testing of your IT systems, or whether you want the test to include social engineering and phishing attacks to test your “human firewall.”

“Phishing is an absolutely massive problem, so you should absolutely consider it,” advised McLaughlin. “We are getting lots of security engagements where we do a phishing attack and then go in and do security awareness training. This should be high on your list of requirements.”

4. Establish expectations for pen test report

Finding someone with the suitable qualifications to carry out a penetration test and ensuring that the scope of the test meets your needs are two key requirements, but don’t underestimate the importance of the deliverable at the end of the process: the penetration testing service’s report. A penetration test is only valuable if it provides information that can help you improve your security, so the quality of the report is essential.

“At the very least, you should expect a description of every vulnerability discovered and information on how to fix each one,” McLaughlin said. “Some firms will also provide a ‘management report’ of one or two paragraphs of non-technical speak outlining the problems and the risks to the business.”

These can help non-technical senior executives appreciate the seriousness of some security vulnerabilities and understand why resources need to be made available to fix them, he said.

5. Make penetration testing a regular event

A penetration test report is only a snapshot of your IT infrastructure at a single point in time, and it can become out of date very quickly. That means that a penetration test should be a regular event rather than a one-off exercise.

“You should have a pen test at least annually, but the frequency should be decided as an output of a risk assessment,” said Kara. “If you have a sensitive system and you make a change, you should test it to ensure that there are no low-hanging fruit.”

It is possible to check for very obvious security vulnerabilities yourself using vulnerability scanners and automated penetration testing tools, but these should not be seen as a replacement for a full-blown penetration test carried out by a skilled tester. Automated penetration testing tools won’t find less obvious vulnerabilities that require a degree of creativity to exploit.

Another problem with testing your own infrastructure, according to Gartner analyst John Pescatore: “There is an issue when internal people test things, because they fall into a pattern of testing and tend not to find paths through less valuable assets.”

The 13 questions you need to ask a penetration testing company

  • What industry certifications does the company have?
  • How many penetration testers does it employ?
  • Which named individual(s) will carry out the penetration testing?
  • What professional qualifications and certifications do they have?
  • How experienced are they?
  • What assistance can the penetration testing company provide in scoping the tests?
  • Does it offer social engineering and phishing testing?
  • Can it follow these up with security awareness/anti-phishing training?
  • How would it carry out a penetration test, and on what time scale?
  • What will the test cost, and under what circumstances might the final cost increase?
  • What steps do penetration testers take to minimize possible effects on your business?
  • What reports and recommendations will be provided after the test, and how much detail will they include?
  • Can the penetration testing company provide testimonials or references from other customers?

Penetration testing pitfalls

This highlights a potential problem with penetration testing companies, too. If you stick with the same penetration testing service for too long, its staff could also fall into “a pattern of testing,” as Pescatore puts it. If that happens, they may fail to spot problems which may be more obvious to a fresh pair of eyes.

So should you change your penetration testing company regularly? “A decent pen testing provider will have enough testers to rotate so you can use a different consultant each time for a few years before changing a company,” Kara said.

But First Base Technologies’ McLaughlin is not so sure that is necessary. “A degree of familiarity with your systems can help, because we are trying to simulate cyber attacks, and criminals won’t go in blind,” he said. “Cycling suppliers can be a good thing, but if a tester knows your systems, then that can keep the cost of the test down and it can help them focus their energy.”

Should you keep staff in the pen test loop?

An important thing you need to decide before a penetration test is whether to let your security and other IT staff know when the test is scheduled.

“If we are doing a check-box test and have administrative access to servers, then everyone should be aware,” McLaughlin said. “But if we are simulating an unexpected attack – a so called ‘red team exercise’ – then you wouldn’t let your staff know so you can see how they react.”

Minimizing penetration test disruptions

One worry that you may have is that a penetration test could lead to disruption, crashed servers or denial of service for employees or even customers. It’s a possibility, Kara said, but worries are probably overblown. “It rarely happens, and we try to do tests without affecting the production environment, but by its nature a pen test is probing the unknown and it can have unknown effects.”

This risk can largely be mitigated by good communication, McLaughlin said. “Our tester is always in contact with the client, so if we notice that a server is slowing down, we would notify the client, and vice versa.”

Penetration test pricing

One final thing to mention is penetration test pricing. Both Kara and McLaughlin recommend getting at least three quotes for pen tests that are clearly scoped so you know what you are paying for.

Like many things in life, don’t forget that when it comes to penetration testing companies, you often get what you pay for. Going for the lowest-cost option with a tester who is under qualified or inexperienced is unlikely to lead to the best outcome.

List of penetration testing companies

Here are a few of the companies offering penetration testing services:

  • Rapid7
  • Netragard
  • Nettitude
  • Perspective Risk
  • Praetorian
  • First Base Technologies

Source

Jesse Kurrus, M.S., OSCP, CEH, Security+, Linux+, Network+, CISSP | Senior Penetration Tester and Technical Trainer

Summary: Jesse Kurrus is a cybersecurity expert with a breadth and depth of knowledge, professional experience, and top of the line credentials directly related to his field of expertise. He has provided quality training for thousands of students online, has mentored them one-on-one, and has coached many to acquire jobs in the cyber field. Professional strengths include security analysis, intrusion detection, ethical hacking, penetration testing, training, and technical writing. Jesse has a true passion for cybersecurity and information technology, and an insatiable ambition to further his knowledge and professional skill set.

Specialties: Intrusion Detection / Network Security Monitoring (Security Onion, Snort, Bro, and Suricata); SIEM Technology (Elasticsearch, Logstash, Kibana (ELK), ArcSight, and Splunk); PCAP analysis (Tcpdump, Wireshark, NetworkMiner, NetWitness/Security Analytics); Penetration Testing (Kali Linux, BurpSuite, Nikto, Nmap, Metasploit, etc.)

Current Degrees/Certifications: M.S. in Information Technology with Information Assurance Specialization / B.S. in Computer Networks and Security / Network+, A+, Security+, Linux+, Certified Ethical Hacker v8 (CEH), Offensive Security Certified Professional (OSCP), Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), eLearnSecurity Web application Penetration Tester (eWPT)

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CISM Certification | Certified Information Security Manager

Gain a competitive edge as an active informed professional in information systems, cybersecurity and business. ISACA® membership offers you FREE or discounted access to new knowledge, tools and training. Members can also earn up to 72 or more FREE CPE credit hours each year toward advancing your expertise and maintaining your certifications.

As an ISACA member, you have access to a network of dynamic information systems professionals near at hand through our more than 200 local chapters, and around the world through our over 145,000-strong global membership community. Participate in ISACA chapter and online groups to gain new insight and expand your professional influence. ISACA membership offers these and many more ways to help you all career long.

Validate your expertise and experience. Whether you are in or looking to land an entry-level position, an experienced IT practitioner or manager, or at the top of your field, ISACA® offers the credentials to prove you have what it takes to excel in your current and future roles.

Take advantage of our CSX® cybersecurity certificates to prove your cybersecurity know-how and the specific skills you need for many technical roles. Likewise our COBIT® certificates show your understanding and ability to implement the leading global framework for enterprise governance of information and technology (EGIT). More certificates are in development. Beyond certificates, ISACA also offers globally recognized CISA®, CRISC™, CISM®, CGEIT® and CSX-P certifications that affirm holders to be among the most qualified information systems and cybersecurity professionals in the world.

ISACA® is fully tooled and ready to raise your personal or enterprise knowledge and skills base. No matter how broad or deep you want to go or take your team, ISACA has the structured, proven and flexible training options to take you from any level to new heights and destinations in IT audit, risk management, control, information security, cybersecurity, IT governance and beyond.

ISACA delivers expert-designed in-person training on-site through hands-on, Training Week courses across North America, through workshops and sessions at conferences around the globe, and online. Build on your expertise the way you like with expert interaction on-site or virtually, online through FREE webinars and virtual summits, or on demand at your own pace.

Get in the know about all things information systems and cybersecurity. When you want guidance, insight, tools and more, you’ll find them in the resources ISACA® puts at your disposal. ISACA resources are curated, written and reviewed by experts—most often, our members and ISACA certification holders. These leaders in their fields share our commitment to pass on the benefits of their years of real-world experience and enthusiasm for helping fellow professionals realize the positive potential of technology and mitigate its risk.

Available 24/7 through white papers, publications, blog posts, podcasts, webinars, virtual summits, training and educational forums and more, ISACA resources.”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”features”:4,”children”:[{“text”:”Resources Home”,”link”:”http://www.isaca.org/resources”,”desc”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”image”:”/-/media/images/isacadp/project/isaca/resources/resources-home-nav.png”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”Insights & Expertise”,”link”:”/resources/insights-and-expertise”,”desc”:”Audit Programs, Publications and Whitepapers”,”image”:”/-/media/images/isacadp/project/isaca/icons/rims-isaca-bridging-the-digital-risk-gap-cover.jpg”,”template”:”vertical”},{“text”:”COBIT”,”link”:”/resources/cobit”,”desc”:”The leading framework for the governance and management of enterprise IT.”,”image”:”/-/media/images/isacadp/project/isaca/icons/cobit-nav.png”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”Journal”,”link”:”/resources/isaca-journal”,”desc”:”Peer-reviewed articles on a variety of industry topics.”,”image”:”/-/media/images/isacadp/project/isaca/resources/resources-journal-nav.png”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”Frameworks, Standards and Models”,”link”:”/resources/frameworks-standards-and-models”,”desc”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”News and Trends”,”link”:”/resources/news-and-trends”,”desc”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”COBIT Focus”,”link”:”/resources/news-and-trends/newsletters/cobit-focus”,”desc”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”The ISACA Podcast”,”link”:”/resources/news-and-trends/isaca-podcast-library”,”desc”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”Glossary”,”link”:”/resources/glossary”,”desc”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”}]},{“text”:”Enterprise”,”link”:”http://www.isaca.org/enterprise”,”desc”:”

Add to the know-how and skills base of your team, the confidence of stakeholders and performance of your organization and its products with ISACA Enterprise Solutions. ISACA® offers training solutions customizable for every area of information systems and cybersecurity, every experience level and every style of learning. Our certifications and certificates affirm enterprise team members’ expertise and build stakeholder confidence in your organization. Beyond training and certification, ISACA’s CMMI® models and platforms offer risk-focused programs for enterprise and product assessment and improvement.

On the road to ensuring enterprise success, your best first steps are to explore our solutions and schedule a conversation with an ISACA Enterprise Solutions specialist.

“,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”features”:4,”children”:[{“text”:”Enterprise Home”,”link”:”http://www.isaca.org/enterprise”,”desc”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”image”:”/-/media/images/isacadp/project/isaca/icons/dropdown-nav-icons/enterprise-nav.png”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”Train”,”link”:”http://www.isaca.org/enterprise/enterprise-training”,”desc”:”Build your team’s know-how and skills with customized training.”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”Certify”,”link”:”/enterprise/enterprise-credentialing”,”desc”:”Affirm your employees’ expertise, elevate stakeholder confidence.”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”Performance”,”link”:”/enterprise/enterprise-performance”,”desc”:”Build capabilities and improve your enterprise performance.”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”Partner with ISACA”,”link”:”/enterprise/partner-with-isaca”,”desc”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”},{“text”:”Contact Us”,”link”:”http://www.isaca.org/enterprise”,”desc”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”image”:”http://www.isaca.org/”,”template”:”text”}]}];

Build a Strategic Team

Prove you can manage information security programs
and become a strategic asset to enterprise leadership.

ISACA’s Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) certification indicates expertise in information security governance, program development and management, incident management and risk management. Take your career out of the technical realm to management!

ISACA’s Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) certification is for those with technical expertise and experience in IS/IT security and control and wants to make the move from team player to manager. CISM can add credibility and confidence to your interactions with internal and external stakeholders, peers and regulators.

ISACA’s Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) certification brings credibility to your team and ensures alignment between the organization’s information security program and its broader goals and objectives. CISM can validate your team’s commitment to compliance, security and integrity and increase customer retention! Learn more about corporate training!

Whether you are seeking a new career opportunity or striving to grow within your current organization, a CISM certification proves your expertise in these work-related domains:

  • Information Security Governance

  • Information Risk Management

  • Information Security Program Development & Management

  • Information Security Incident Management

CISM Job Practice Details

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PREPARE FOR THE EXAM

Set yourself up to succeed on exam day. Whether you prefer to prep on your own time or want the additional guidance and interaction that comes with live instruction, we have the right CISM test prep solutions for you.

Learn More

Want to test yourself and see if you’re ready to take the exam? Take this FREE 10-question CISM practice quiz.

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TAKE AND PASS THE EXAM

Register for an exam and purchase study aids and an ISACA membership, which will immediately give you significant exam-related discounts. Access the Exam Candidate Guide here.

Your payment will be due within 90 days from the date of registration. Once you pay, your registration will be valid for one year from the date of registration.

Learn More

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APPLY TO GET CERTIFIED

The final step to becoming CISM certified is to submit the CISM Certification Application! Prior to doing so, the following requirements must be met:

  • Pass the CISM Exam within the last 5 years.
  • Have the relevant full-time work experience in the CISM Job Practice Areas.
  • Submit the CISM Certification Application including Application Processing Fee.

Apply for Certification

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MAINTAIN YOUR CERTIFICATION

The goal of the continuing professional education (CPE) policy is to ensure that all CISMs maintain an adequate level of current knowledge and proficiency in the field of enterprise security management.. This proves to your peers and external and internal stakeholders that your skills and knowledge are up to date and relevant.

Learn More

Contact ISACA’s ISACA’s Customer Experience Center and/or visit our vibrant online community for more insights and discussions with CISM holders.

Source

Ethical Hacking – Skills – Tutorialspoint

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As an ethical hacker, you will need to understand various hacking techniques such as −

  • Password guessing and cracking
  • Session hijacking
  • Session spoofing
  • Network traffic sniffing
  • Denial of Service attacks
  • Exploiting buffer overflow vulnerabilities
  • SQL injection

In this chapter, we will discuss some of the skills that you would require to become an expert in Ethical Hacking.

Basic Skills

Computer Hacking is a Science as well as an Art. Like any other expertise, you need to put a lot of effort in order to acquire knowledge and become an expert hacker. Once you are on the track, you would need more effort to keep up-to-date with latest technologies, new vulnerabilities and exploitation techniques.

  • An ethical hacker must be a computer systems expert and needs to have very strong programming and computer networking skills.

  • An ethical hacker needs to have a lot of patience, persistence, and perseverance to try again and again and wait for the required result.

Additionally, an ethical hacker should be smart enough to understand the situation and other users’ mind-set in order to apply social engineering exploits. A good ethical hacker has great problem-solving skills too.

Courses & Certifications

This tutorial provides the basic guidelines to become a successful Ethical Hacker. If you want to excel in this field, then you might choose to pursue the following courses and certifications −

  • Obtain a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science or A+ Certificate to gain an understanding of the most common hardware and software technologies.

  • Get into a programmer’s role for a few years and then switch to get a tech support position.

  • Proceed to get network certifications like Network+ or CCNA and then security certifications like Security+, CISSP, or TICSA.

  • It is recommended that you get some work experience as a Network Engineer and System Administrator to understand networks and systems inside out.

  • Keep going through various books, tutorials and papers to understand various computer security aspects and take them as a challenge to secure your network and computer systems as network security engineer.

  • Study courses which cover creating Trojan horses, backdoors, viruses, and worms, denial of service (DoS) attacks, SQL injection, buffer overflow, session hijacking, and system hacking.

  • Master the art of penetration testing, footprinting and reconnaissance, and social engineering.

  • Finally go for a Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) Certification.

GIAC (Global Information Assurance Certification) and Offensive Security Certified Professional (OSCP) are additional IT security certifications which will add a lot of value to your profile.

Final Note

You need to stay as a White Hat Hacker which means you need to work within given boundaries. Never intrude or attack any computer or network without a required permission from the authorities.

As a final note, it is highly recommended that you refrain from engaging yourself in black hat hacking which may spoil your entire career.

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Source

DOD DISA discloses data breach

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), a Department of Defense (DOD) agency tasked with providing secure telecommunications and IT support for the White House, US diplomats, and military troops, has disclosed a data breach.

According to breach notification letters sent to DISA employees last week, the security incident took place between May and July 2019, when a DISA system “may have been compromised.”

DISA says that employee personal information, including social security numbers, was exposed during this timeframe, but did not say how many were impacted.

The DOD agency did not provide any other details about the breach, however, it did add that it had no evidence to suggest that employees’ personal data was misused prior to sending the notification letter.

DISA employs around 8,000 military and civilian employees, according to Reuters, which first spotted the notification letter earlier today.

The agency, in accordance with US laws, is now offering free credit monitoring to all impacted.

This is the second data breach the DOD has disclosed in the last two years. In October 2018, more than 30,000 DOD military and civilian personnel had their personal and payment card details exposed via a security breach at a third-party contractor.

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